Biomimicry: How We Learn From Nature’s Success

December 22nd, 2009 | 5 Comments »

Janine Benyus is a science author who is full of great ideas. One of her passions is to promote the ingenuity and function in our products based on the performance of the nature around us. This process, called biomimicry, is one that aims to examine the systems and elements at work in nature in order to recreate them in our modern products and designs.

Designing something based on the functions and successes of nature is nothing new, but it is certainly something that we have drifted away from recently. To help challenge the conception that we have to conquer nature in our designs, Benyus helped create AskNature.org, a project to display nature’s problem solving skills so we can learn from and recreate them. By recreating the existing natural systems we can help preserve our environment, so that we can continue to learn from it in the future.

“The sophisticated, almost pro-growth angle of Benyus shows the great potential profitability of copying some of nature’s time-tested, nonpolluting, room-temperature manufacturing and computing technologies.”
– New York Times

The following video is from Ted.com, standing for Technology, Entertainment, Design. It is a nonprofit that works to spread “Ideas Worth Spreading” at annual conferences in both California and England, as well as other conferences throughout the year. You can watch almost all of the talks at their website, on topics such as climate, phycology, education, genetics, and almost anything in between.



 

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